Princess Madison

After having three healthy boys, and being forty years old the news of another child was a shock in itself. They say some of the best things turn out to be surprises, and that is so true in my case.

Almost from the beginning of the pregnany there were many red flags, with abnormal tests results continually. An Amniocentisis was "strongly" recomended, along with the consolation that I had three other great pregnancies, and we should just wait and see. When the diagnosis of a Trisomy 21 baby was absolute, the good news was the baby was a girl, I have wanted more than anything my entire life. All I remember was hearing "explore my options". I was told it would be a surgical procedure called a D and E, where the scalpal, goes through the babies brains. I asked myself what could I live with more, a child with disabilites, who would be to some degree "retarded", or living with the fact that I got rid of an innocent child, just because she had these disabilities. It was NEVER an option for me. I was having the baby regardless  of anything and all my fears.

My little daughter has taught me life lessons that I cannot begin to explain. I see life in an entirely different way. She looks at me differently than my other kids did, it's hard to explain. The love I have for her is beyond words.

My friends told me God picks special people to have special children, and I was chosen because of my maternal ways, and that God doesn't give us anymore than we can handle. Madison has a glow about her that lights up a room, if you want to see pure goodness, this little soul has it in a way I have never seen before. Was I afraid when I was pregnant? I was terrified.  Would I do it again? In a minute. Was it easy? No it was not. Is it easy now? Yes. She is an amazing baby who smiles all the time and is happy. Remember everything happens for a reason and Madison has made me a better more tolerant person. 

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-The support, information and encouragement provided by the PPFL parents is not meant to take the place of medical advice by a medical professional. Any specific questions about care should be directed to a health care professional familiar with the situation.