Frank

Frank is my middle child. He is Downs Syndrome. He is now 41 years old. Some of your younger parents might be encouraged by Frank's accomplishments. Frank's role in the family as son, brother, and uncle has been welcomed. He
has an older sister, a younger brother, three nieces and one nephew.

Frank has always been very outgoing, loveable and personable - not in-your-face loveable; but loveable nonetheless. Frank was always blessed with teachers who were dedicated. Frank has "aged out" of his BOCES program
for 20 years now. However, he has not stopped learning as we were told he would. About 5 or 6 years ago we purchased a computer and Frank has learned to use the internet and e-mail. Frank has been learning karate for the past 20 years. He has achieved third-degree black belt status (so far as his
karate master knows, he is the only Downs Syndrome in the country to have achieved a black belt). He has participated in numerous karate tournaments. Frank has learned to play the electronic keyboard. He has been taking lessons and has achieved a degree of proficiency. Frank derives great pleasure from music. Frank has participated in numerous Special Olympic events even going to the states once or twice. He is also involved in many recreational activities included weight lifting.

Frank works as a teacher's aide in a special school. He has been working at this job for twenty years and receives a paycheck commiserate with his work,
life insurance and health benefits. Since his father passed away in 2006,
Frank has been a pillar of strength for me. He lives at home and is a great
help around the house.

I could not imagine life without Frank. When my daughter got pregnant for
the first time the doctor wanted to perform amniocentesis. My daughter
said, "Why? If there was a problem, I would not abort."

Dorothy Scarfone

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-The support, information and encouragement provided by the PPFL parents is not meant to take the place of medical advice by a medical professional. Any specific questions about care should be directed to a health care professional familiar with the situation.